[Book Review #19] All The Bright Places by Jennifer Niven

 

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The Fault in Our Stars meets Eleanor and Park in this exhilarating and heart-wrenching love story about a girl who learns to live from a boy who intends to die.

Soon to be a major motion picture starring Elle Fanning!
 
Theodore Finch is fascinated by death, and he constantly thinks of ways he might kill himself. But each time, something good, no matter how small, stops him.

Violet Markey lives for the future, counting the days until graduation, when she can escape her Indiana town and her aching grief in the wake of her sister’s recent death.

When Finch and Violet meet on the ledge of the bell tower at school, it’s unclear who saves whom. And when they pair up on a project to discover the “natural wonders” of their state, both Finch and Violet make more important discoveries: It’s only with Violet that Finch can be himself—a weird, funny, live-out-loud guy who’s not such a freak after all. And it’s only with Finch that Violet can forget to count away the days and start living them. But as Violet’s world grows, Finch’s begins to shrink.

This is an intense, gripping novel perfect for fans of Jay Asher, Rainbow Rowell, John Green, Gayle Forman, and Jenny Downham from a talented new voice in YA, Jennifer Niven.The Fault in Our Stars meets Eleanor and Park in this exhilarating and heart-wrenching love story about a girl who learns to live from a boy who intends to die.

Soon to be a major motion picture starring Elle Fanning!
 
Theodore Finch is fascinated by death, and he constantly thinks of ways he might kill himself. But each time, something good, no matter how small, stops him.

Violet Markey lives for the future, counting the days until graduation, when she can escape her Indiana town and her aching grief in the wake of her sister’s recent death.

When Finch and Violet meet on the ledge of the bell tower at school, it’s unclear who saves whom. And when they pair up on a project to discover the “natural wonders” of their state, both Finch and Violet make more important discoveries: It’s only with Violet that Finch can be himself—a weird, funny, live-out-loud guy who’s not such a freak after all. And it’s only with Finch that Violet can forget to count away the days and start living them. But as Violet’s world grows, Finch’s begins to shrink.

This is an intense, gripping novel perfect for fans of Jay Asher, Rainbow Rowell, John Green, Gayle Forman, and Jenny Downham from a talented new voice in YA, Jennifer Niven.

Book Specifications:

Author: Jennifer Niven

Format: Paperback

Part of a Series: No.

Release Date: January 6, 2015

Publisher: Knopf

No. of Pages: 388 pages

Price: 439.00Php

Genre: Young Adult, Mental Health, Romance, Contemporary

Book Review:

The Cover: The cover was regal, featuring half a dozen of post-it notes containing the title on one side, plus images of a flower and a bird on the other. It was a simple cover with a simple color scheme and it was very pleasing to the eye. Not to mention the connection that will be relatable once you read the book. I loved it. And the font was as cool as handwriting. It is absolutely divine! (5 out of 5 stars)

The Story: The book revolved around the lives of Theodore Finch, whose whole life was dedicated to his fascination with deaths and suicides, and Violet Markey, whose life was carefully paved right in front of her but had to take a detour. The story started off with Violet and Finch, having their first encounter at their high school’s bell tower where Violet was, according to my understanding of the story, trying to jump off the ledge. She didn’t know what to do after the unexpected death of her loved sister, Eleanor. As the story goes on, they find themselves stuck with each other to create a project that’s requiring them to spend time with one another and wander through different sites in Indiana. As time passes by, they fall hopelessly in love with each other while filling the broken lives of one another. In order to express myself better, I shall once again enumerate the great points of the story.

  • I loved how our two protagonists came from something that they can both relate to. Violet, somehow, survived the accident that killed her sister, while Finch seems to be greatly fascinated with death. Coming from something common and similar really does open lots of chances for people to get to know each other a little better and I like that as foundation for their relationship.
  • I loved the idea of the project assigned to Violet and Finch. The wanderings. I loved the fact that they got to know, understand, and fell in love with each other through the wanderings they went on. And the idea of leaving something behind as they left their area of wandering was just so sweet and iconic. I don’t know why I was highly entertained and swooned by the idea of this, but that’s just me.
  • Finch, in my most honest opinion, is in line for greatness that are Augustus Waters, Park Sheridan, and the likes. His character was the one who made me fall in love with the whole story. It was because of Finch’s strength to carry on, amidst all the hurt and drama in his life, that made me completely fall head over heels for this novel. He was broken, damaged, and somehow a little twisted, but he was in every way one of the best male characters I have ever read about.

I loved this book just as much as I loved my all time favorites, The Fault In Our Stars and Eleanor & Park. I can’t believe I’ve found my newest most favorite book. (5 out of 5 stars)

The Ending: *This part is filled with spoilers. I suggest you skip this part if you don’t want to cry later on.* I understand that Theodore Finch is super fascinated with death, but good God, why did he have to die? I understand that he was diagnosed with manic depression and bipolar disorder. But why can’t he just try a bit more harder for the sake of his love for Violet? I just can’t accept it. However, with all the facts about quicksand found at the middle parts of the book made me guess that Finch may die because of drowning. And I was right, you guys! I can’t believe it! Never have I ever badly wanted to be wrong in all my life. Not to mention how Violet’s coping with the loss of her sister as well all in under a year. I can’t fathom how I would react to something as devastating as that. Oh, and let’s not forget about the quotes! The quotes found within the last 100 pages were excruciatingly heart-wrenching. It was as if my heart was actually being squeezed out of my chest. And no, I’m not kidding. But, I can’t believe I’m going to say this, but I loved the ending in all its full flaw and glory. May you rest in eternal peace, Theodore Finch. (5 out of 5 stars)


The Verdict: Need I actually say more? No. I’m ending it here. I LOVED THIS BOOK! Will re-read this once I finish reading all the books in my infinite TBR list. Oh, and thank you, Jennifer Niven, for introducing me to Violet and Finch. I am eternally grateful. (5 out of 5 stars)

Quotable Quotes:

“May your eye go to the Sun, To the wind your soul… You are all the colors in one, at full brightness.” – Violet Markey

“The thing I realize is, that it’s not what you take, it’s what you leave.” – Violet Markey

“The great thing about this life of ours is that you can be someone different to everybody.” – Theodore Finch

“The problem with people is they forget that most of the time it’s the small things that count.” – Theodore Finch

“I learned that there is good in this world, if you look hard enough for it. I learned that not everyone is disappointing, including me, and that a 1,257 bump in the ground can feel higher than a bell tower if you’re standing next to the right person.” – Theodore Finch

“No more winter at all. Finch, you brought me spring.” – Violet Markey

Oh my god, the quotes!!!

FOOTER

6 thoughts on “[Book Review #19] All The Bright Places by Jennifer Niven

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